TGJ: Courtesy on the Bridge by Marty Callahan

Tiger’s Great Journey Continued…

An Adventure Story for Youth Who Want to Make the World a Better Place

The air grew crisp as Tiger and Blake set out across a great forest at the top of the cliff on
which Tiger had discovered his courage. As they hiked silently up the sloping terrain of the
woods, Tiger enjoyed a sense of wonder about the towering trees, the colorful plants beneath them, and the birds and mammals he knew were watching as they walked gently and with great respect through the animals’ home.

Tiger carried the map that he had found with him. It was safely tucked away in his pack
in the pouch he had found it in. Just before starting this leg of their journey, he had referred to it and was using it as a guide. His destination was Ryoku Mountain and the Temple of the Clouds.

They trekked for miles through the forest until the trees gave way to a rocky and steep
plateau. As they passed the last of the trees, Tiger turned and bowed to the majestic forest they’d moved safely through. Blake giggled to see Tiger bowing to trees. He knew that this journey was not just important to Tiger, but it had totally consumed him. To Tiger becoming a Black Belt Shoka Leader was the most important thing he could possibly do with his life. It gave him a sense of order and purpose, and it made him feel connected to something bigger than himself. Nothing was going to stop him from getting to the top of Ryoku Mountain and the Temple of the Clouds. This was not an ordinary hike; it was a spiritual quest. Tiger was finding himself—who he was meant to be. He had seen so many people suffer because of problems in the world, and he wanted to play a role in finding a solution to at least some of those problems. But he knew that no one would pay attention to him as he was, so he would have to become someone greater. This journey would enable him to do that. It would transform him into the leader he was called to be.

Blake looked at the forest and saw the beauty and vastness that Tiger saw. He became
aware that all people rely on the wonders of nature, which must be respected. Tiger bowed again to the forest, took one last look at the explosion of life beneath the trees, and then turned and motioned to Blake to move on.

They walked for hours across the rocks, stopping now and again to rest or to scoop cool,
clear water from natural basins in the stone. Tiger became aware that he was able to walk farther and farther without resting, and that the muscles of his legs were becoming stronger. He liked the way his body felt as he and Blake climbed toward a high point. He wondered what awaited them on the other side.

When they crested the stony point, Tiger couldn’t believe his eyes. The land fell off
sharply into a great, deep canyon. “How will we ever cross it?” he asked. Blake raised a hand to point off to their right. “We’ll cross there,” he said. Tiger squinted and searched, and at last noticed what appeared to be a fine line across the top of the canyon. As they walked closer to it, Tiger could see that it was a narrow, rope walking bridge suspended high above the canyon floor. Noticing how it swayed in the breeze made Tiger feel uneasy.

When the two of them reached the beginning of the footbridge, Tiger realized that
because the bridge was so narrow, they would have no choice but to cross it single-file. The
flimsy bridge looked to be a mile long and a thousand feet above the canyon. The thought of
crossing it made him tremble. He was reminded again of something simple that Sensei had told him: “stay focused.” In this situation, he knew the goal was to get to the other side. This was simple to understand but very, very difficult to do.

Without looking down, Tiger gazed across the bridge and then placed his right foot
lightly on the first ancient plank. As he did, it dropped just enough to frighten him. He glanced back at Blake who was close behind. Blake had seen what had happened and nodded at Tiger to let him know that he was with him.

The bridge, which was made entirely of rope except for the wooden planks, swung a bit
to the left and then to the right, causing Tiger to grip the rope rails for dear life. He got a queasy feeling in his stomach and knew that he couldn’t look down. He focused his attention on the task before him and quieted his fears.

“Look straight ahead,” Tiger said to Blake. “Feel the strength of the bridge. It will move,
but it will not break. Stay focused on taking one step at a time.” Tiger didn’t know how he knew this, but he just knew it to be true.

He took a deep breath and felt his tense muscles relax a bit. Rather than tense up with
every motion of the bridge, he began to move in harmony with it. His fear gave way to an intense appreciation of the fine old bridge and the fantastic canyon below.

But what was this? Gazing far ahead, he saw that at the other end a large group of people
were moving single-file onto the bridge. Had the people not noticed him and Blake? The bridge was so narrow that it would be impossible for the two parties to pass. He and Blake had come so far, and they had started across long before the other group. Tiger decided to keep going and hoped the strangers would back off when they realized they had entered a bridge that was already in use and that they should have waited for him and Blake to make it all the way across.

The large group stopped. Tiger thought this was strange, but they were still too far away
for him to make out what they were doing. It appeared that most just stood and waited, while two or three people in the back knelt on the bridge. In time, the entire group began moving again, slowly, toward Tiger and Blake.

At last, the two parties moved close enough together for Tiger to see that a tall, powerful looking man was in front of what appeared to be several families whose members, old and young, carried trunks and cases and baskets. They seemed to be crossing the bridge while
weighed down with everything they owned in the world.

When Tiger and Blake drew close, he thought again about how far they had come and
how they could make it across the bridge in only a few minutes—if there was not this long line of people in front of them.

Tiger noticed that the man who appeared to be the leader wore a scowl on his face. He
ordered his people to stop. Then he shouted to Tiger and Blake, “Halt!” They stopped about
thirty feet from him. The man signaled to three young men, who carried swords and looked to be warriors, and the four of them stepped forward on the heavily burdened, swaying bridge.

Tiger was worried. These strangers looked mean, and there was no room on this bridge
for a fight. The leader had a red face and appeared angry as his men stepped up and stopped only a few feet away. Tiger greeted them with a deep, respectful bow. Why he did that he didn’t know, but it seemed like the right thing to do. At the same time, he watched them closely.

The strangers appeared to be surprised by Tiger’s bow, and the leader bowed slightly in
return; his warriors did the same. Then the leader stiffened his back and barked, “Go back, or prepare to fight. My people need to cross this bridge, and you are in our way.”

Tiger spoke to him calmly. “But we entered the bridge long before you did and only have
a short distance to go.”

“Silence!” the leader shouted as his warriors squeezed the grips of their swords. “We
have no time for this! We were forced to leave our village, and now we are escaping a fearsome enemy. We could not wait for you to pass over the bridge and are placing ourselves in peril while stopping to talk to you. Back off the bridge, or prepare to die!”

Tiger thought the pounding of his heart would split open his chest, but he bowed again,
this time lowering his eyes to the strangers’ feet. Then he spoke. “We are in no hurry to cross this bridge, but there is a great urgency in your crossing. So we will turn back and, if you so permit, to allow you to move more quickly, we will help your people carry their belongings.”

With those words, the looks on the strangers’ faces softened. The leader shook his head in
amazement. “You are kind; thank you. Please forgive my behavior, but we are weary and are in fear of our lives. We will be grateful for your help in getting across the bridge.” With that, he and his men bowed.

Seeming to remember something, the leader added, “We stopped a while back to loosen
some of the planks on the bridge to slow our enemy. I do not want for you to be hurt, so when we get to the other side, I will have a couple of our young men accompany you to the loosened planks and ensure that you cross them safely.”

“Many thanks to you,” Tiger said.

Blake and Tiger walked toward the fleeing people, hoisted two heavy trunks onto their
shoulders, turned around, and carried the trunks clear to the end of the bridge where they had started.

When everyone reached that side, the leader thanked Tiger and Blake again and wished
them a safe journey. The two boys, in turn, wished them the same and said they hoped the people would find a better, safer place to live. The two groups parted as friends.

Tiger, Blake, and two young warriors then set out once again across the bridge with the
warriors in the lead. From having walked back and forth along the bridge, Tiger and Blake now had their “legs” and could move fast without the fear of slipping. When they got to the loosened planks, the warriors made sure that Tiger and Blake crossed safely before heading back to catch up with their people.

Once they made it to the end of the bridge, Blake sighed deeply. “I thought we were
going to have to fight out there,” he said.

Tiger replied, “Sensei told me that sometimes there is no avoiding a fight. But most of the
time, we can use our training and our intelligence to prevent violence.”

“Like you did when you bowed,” Blake said. “I could see that the stranger, who was very
angry, started to calm down when you honored him in that way. And he changed completely
when you offered our help in carrying their possessions.”

“We learned an important lesson about courtesy today, Blake, one that we will probably
have to use often on this journey.”

“It looks like courtesy is our first line of self defense. That simple show of respect turned
a potential enemy into a friend. What could be better than that?” observed Blake.

Tiger told Blake that they should move out of sight, because the enemies the fleeing
people feared were probably on their way. From the bridge, they headed off to the left and up a gentle slope to nearby hills. Safely out of view, Tiger and Blake could see a small band of warriors far to the south making their way to the footbridge. They were carrying swords, staffs, and clubs, and they jogged in tight formation. Even from this distance, Tiger and Blake could hear the pounding of their feet. The boys knew that they were not to be trifled with. After watching for a while, they looked at the map.

“Wow, Blake!” Tiger said excitedly. “There’s an image now of a person bowing on the
map above the footbridge and the word COURTESY.”

“This map is so cool!”

Tiger smiled his agreement and then carefully folded the parchment and placed it back in
its pouch. He knew this was no ordinary map.

 

Marty Callahan has spent his life understanding and improving the lives of students both young and old.  His passion led to the founding of Shotokan Karate Leadership School in Santa Rosa, CA in 1981, with a dream to awaken the extraordinary leader in his students. Having inspired, taught, coached, supported, and trained over 15,000 students in 40,000 classes in Santa Rosa, Marty has become Sonoma County’s preeminent martial arts leadership instructor. His students, hundreds of whom have gone on to become leaders in their chosen fields, appreciate his engaging, student centered approach to teaching and they believe you will too.

Student Spotlight – Richard Wantuck

What Does Karate Mean to Me?

by Richard Wantuck

I was introduced to the Shotokan style of karate when I was in my early 20’s. At that time, I was instantly attracted to the concept of this traditional martial art – the idea that a
person could defend himself by activating the intrinsic power of one’s own body, without the use of weapons. As a beginning practitioner, I initially trained under an
accomplished, black-belt student of Sensei Masataka Mori – who was an original student of Masatoshi Nakayama, the 1st chief instructor of the Japan Karate Association. Nakayama,
in turn, was a direct disciple of Shotokan’s original founder, Master Gichin Funakoshi. In those earlier days, I began to learn the basic karate techniques and kata, a process which helped me begin to imagine how I might also become accomplished in this noble art.

Over time, I practiced karate off and on when my life’s travels permitted me to find a
Shotokan dojo in which to train, but this inconsistency prevented me from advancing in
the art. It was not until I reached my fifth decade that I found the Shotokan Karate
Leadership School, where I began to train more consistently and seriously under the
direction of Sensei Marty Callahan, 8th Dan black belt. I steadily worked my way up in
rank and, in October 2019, I finally attained a life-long goal: 1st degree black belt!

Master Funakoshi’s Okinawan translation of kara-té means “empty hand.” It is a noble
martial art, deriving from ancient Buddhist roots. Karate was perfected over the course
of many centuries, and passed along from generation to generation. To me, there is a
profound significance in this connection through time. In fact, the Japanese word
Sensei, or teacher, can also be translated as one who has gone before. I truly appreciate that
my struggles to achieve a certain level of mastery of the art take me along the same path
experienced by countless other karate-ka over the centuries, and in all the continents on
Earth. Equally important, Funakoshi’s emphasis on character development and
training to be a “peaceful warrior” fits well with my own personal philosophy and
world view.

Karate embodies physical, mental, and spiritual components – these are the essential building blocks of character. I seek to develop my understanding and cultivate my abilities in all three areas. From a physical standpoint, it is exciting to experience increased stamina, strength, and agility through training. While there are always  higher levels of physical fitness that can be attained, I am pleased with the progress I have made thus far.
Similarly, karate’s dynamic movements enhance my mental ability to focus, and to think more calmly and clearly. This is especially true when attempting to
master new movements or skills that involve complicated, coordinated body movement. And in terms of the spiritual aspect, I have found that the further one explores the true meaning of karate, the more the spirit becomes engaged in a positive, holistic way. As a person who values life-long learning and personal development, karate is ideally
suited to my life’s experience.

I receive many tangible benefits from my practice of karate. Regular practice of the art helps me to stay healthy, physically fit, and mentally alert. These things are important to me because I want to live long and lead an active, productive life. My life has been blessed in many ways and I am grateful for my good fortune. This includes the enormous benefits of a close-knit family which provides love and support, a stable, safe community in which to live, and a bountiful, free country in which to grow and thrive. I want to sustain these values and help pass them on to future generations.

As I proceed on my journey, I realize that the philosophy of karate-do has become an
important influence in my life. Thanks to my training, I am able to focus on my
personal goals and physical wellness more effectively. I am also more patient and
understanding of my own potential, as well as my limitations. These insights help me
formulate and calibrate my plans and aspirations going forward. I look with a great
deal of optimism on my future prospects.

The attitude of karate provides a framework to guide my life’s path in a positive
direction. Our Shotokan dojo creed: seek perfection of character, be faithful, endeavor, respect others, refrain from violent behavior – promotes timeless values and a wholesome way of life. This is as it should be. I am grateful to my teachers and role models for setting this excellent example to follow, and I look forward to teaching young people the virtues of
karate-do for many years to come.

©Richard Wantuck, 2020

A History of Hapkido

Hapkido is a high energy Korean martial art that was developed during the past few centuries before emerging into limelight in the twentieth century through some dedicated artists. Hapkido literally means ‘joining energy way’ or ‘the way of coordinating energy’ or ‘the way of harmony.’ Even though many believe Japan’s Aikido and Hapkido have have common roots, the differences in the styles of fighting suggest the opposite.

Hapkido emphasizes the traditional techniques of grappling, throwing, and joint locks followed by other martial arts, besides giving importance to various kicks, punches, and other striking methods. Apart from these, it also employs traditional weapons such as cane, rope, knife, sword, and short stick.

The traces of actual birth of Hapkido are more of theories and guesses more than facts. However, the emergence of modern-day Hapkido may be ascribed to the efforts of some Korean martial arts enthusiasts in the post Japanese colonial era – Choi Yong-Sool being the most prominent one.

Choi Yong-Sool

Once, while taking a stroll down the yard, a Korean man called Suh Bok-Sub happened to witness one man being attacked by a dozen people. Being a Judo black belt, he considered helping the man, but before he could interfere, he was stunned to see the lone man fight back. And he was defending with such ease and energy that the attackers had to finally flee. Suh accompanied this man – Choi Yong-Sool – and practiced with him the style Choi used, known as Daitô-ryû Aiki-jûjutsu, a parent of Hapkido.

The life of Choi Yong-Sool is unclear and debated. He claims to have learned Daitô-ryû Aiki- jûjutsu from Japanese martial art expert Takeda Sokaku over the course of 30 years. He says he is the only one to have completely learned Takeda’s training and that Takeda had adopted him when he was 11. However, these claims remain controversial as many believe Choi was only Takeda’s servant.

Suh Bok-Sub

From the story above, inspired by Choi’s fighting techniques, Suh became his student. As the two enthusiasts worked together, the art evolved. Suh once defeated his brother-in-law, who was much larger, in a public hand-to-hand combat. In 1959, they decided to shorten their martial art’s name to ‘Hapkido’ from ‘hapki yu kwon sool’.

Ji Han-Jae

It was Ji Han-Jae who popularized the art of Hapkido in Korea and also on the international level. His connections while serving as the head instructor of Hapkido to the presidential bodyguard under president Park Jung Hee helped him form the Korea Hapkido Association in 1965. He later added techniques and methods of his own as the art proliferated outside Korea. In 1986, after the death of Choi, Ji announced that he is to be credited as the founder of modern
Hapkido as what Choi developed was only a primitive version of the current one. But then, these claims are also supported and opposed by many.

In spite of having a vague history embellished with controversial claims, the Korean martial art form remains a favorite among many across the globe.

A History of Hapkido

Hapkido is a high energy Korean martial art that was developed during the past few centuries before emerging into limelight in the twentieth century through some dedicated artists. Hapkido literally means ‘joining energy way’ or ‘the way of coordinating energy’ or ‘the way of harmony.’ Even though many believe Japan’s Aikido and Hapkido have have common roots, the differences in the styles of fighting suggest the opposite.

Hapkido emphasizes the traditional techniques of grappling, throwing, and joint locks followed by other martial arts, besides giving importance to various kicks, punches, and other striking methods. Apart from these, it also employs traditional weapons such as cane, rope, knife, sword, and short stick.

The traces of actual birth of Hapkido are more of theories and guesses more than facts. However, the emergence of modern-day Hapkido may be ascribed to the efforts of some Korean martial arts enthusiasts in the post Japanese colonial era – Choi Yong-Sool being the most prominent one.

Choi Yong-Sool

Once, while taking a stroll down the yard, a Korean man called Suh Bok-Sub happened to witness one man being attacked by a dozen people. Being a Judo black belt, he considered helping the man, but before he could interfere, he was stunned to see the lone man fight back. And he was defending with such ease and energy that the attackers had to finally flee. Suh accompanied this man – Choi Yong-Sool – and practiced with him the style Choi used, known as Daitô-ryû Aiki-jûjutsu, a parent of Hapkido.

The life of Choi Yong-Sool is unclear and debated. He claims to have learned Daitô-ryû Aiki- jûjutsu from Japanese martial art expert Takeda Sokaku over the course of 30 years. He says he is the only one to have completely learned Takeda’s training and that Takeda had adopted him when he was 11. However, these claims remain controversial as many believe Choi was only Takeda’s servant.

Suh Bok-Sub

From the story above, inspired by Choi’s fighting techniques, Suh became his student. As the two enthusiasts worked together, the art evolved. Suh once defeated his brother-in-law, who was much larger, in a public hand-to-hand combat. In 1959, they decided to shorten their martial art’s name to ‘Hapkido’ from ‘hapki yu kwon sool’.

Ji Han-Jae

It was Ji Han-Jae who popularized the art of Hapkido in Korea and also on the international level. His connections while serving as the head instructor of Hapkido to the presidential bodyguard under president Park Jung Hee helped him form the Korea Hapkido Association in 1965. He later added techniques and methods of his own as the art proliferated outside Korea. In 1986, after the death of Choi, Ji announced that he is to be credited as the founder of modern
Hapkido as what Choi developed was only a primitive version of the current one. But then, these claims are also supported and opposed by many.

In spite of having a vague history embellished with controversial claims, the Korean martial art form remains a favorite among many across the globe.