Bullying Prevention Part Two

How to Talk with Educator’s at Your Child’s School About Bullying

(adapted from www.stopbullying.gov and the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program)

Bullying among children is aggressive behavior that is intentional and that involves an imbalance of power or strength. Parents are often reluctant to report to educators that their child is being bullied. Why? Parents may be unsure how best to help their child and may be afraid that they will make the situation worse if they report bullying. They may be embarrassed that their child is being bullied.
Sometimes, children ask parents not to report bullying. Parents may fear being seen as overprotective. They may believe that it is up to their child to stop the bullying.
Children and youth often need help to stop bullying. Parents should never be afraid to call the school to report that their child is being bullied and ask for help to stop the bullying. Students should not have to tolerate bullying at school any more than adults would tolerate similar treatment at work.

The School’s Responsibility
All children are entitled to courteous and respectful treatment by students and staff at school. Educators have a duty to ensure that students have a safe learning environment. Fortunately, most educators take their responsibilities to stop bullying very seriously. Several states have passed anti-bullying laws and require public schools to have an anti-bullying program in place. Ask for a copy of your school’s policy or check the student handbook to see whether your school has policies that will help resolve the problem.

Working with Your Child’s School to Solve the Problem

If your child tells you that he or she has been bullied or if you suspect your child is being bullied, what can you do? Keep a written record of all bullying incidents that your child reports to you. Record the names of the children involved, where and when the bullying occurred, and what happened. Immediately ask to meet with your child’s classroom teacher and explain your concerns in a friendly, non-confrontational way. Ask the teacher about his or her observations: Has he or she noticed or suspected bullying? How is your child
getting along with others in class? Has he or she noticed that your child is being isolated, excluded from playground or other activities with students? Ask the teacher what he or she intends to do to investigate and help to stop the bullying. If you are concerned about how your child is coping with the stress of being bullied, ask to speak with your child’s guidance counselor or other school-based mental health professional. Set up a follow-up appointment with the teacher to discuss progress. If there is no improvement after reporting bullying to your child’s teacher, speak with the school principal. Keep notes from your meetings with teachers and administrators.

What can you expect staff at your child’s school to do about bullying?

School staff should investigate the bullying immediately. After investigating your concerns, they should inform you as to what they plan to do about it. School staff should never have a joint meeting with your child and the child who bullied them. This could be very embarrassing and intimidating for your child. They should not refer the children to mediation. Bullying is a form of victimization, not a conflict. It should not be mediated. Staff should meet with your child to learn about the bullying that he or she has experienced. They should develop a plan to help keep your child safe, and they should be watchful for any future bullying. Educators should assure your child that they will work hard to see that the bullying stops. School personnel should meet with the children who are suspected of taking part in the bullying. They should make it clear to these children that bullying is against school rules and will not be tolerated. If appropriate, they should administer consequences (such as a loss of recess privileges) to the children who bullied and notify their parents. Educators and parents should be careful not to “blame the victim.” Bullying is never the “fault” of the child who is bullied, and he or she shouldn’t be made to feel responsible for being bullied. However, if your child is impulsive or lacks social skills, talk with a school counselor, or other school-based mental health professional. Set up a follow-up appointment with the teacher to discuss progress. If there is no improvement after reporting bullying to your child’s teacher, speak with the school principal. Keep notes
from your meetings with teachers and administrators.

Staff should meet with your child to learn about the bullying that he or she has experienced. They should develop a plan to help keep your child safe, and they should be watchful for any future bullying. Educators should assure your child that they will work hard to see that the bullying stops. School personnel should meet with the children who are suspected of taking part in the bullying. They should make it clear to these children that bullying is against school rules and will not be tolerated. If appropriate, they should administer consequences (such as a loss of recess privileges) to the children who bullied and notify their parents. However, if your child is impulsive or lacks social that some students who are bullying your child are reacting out of annoyance. This doesn’t make the bullying right, but it may help to explain why your child is being bullied.

Give the school reasonable time to investigate and hear both sides of the story. Sometimes, a child who bullies will make false allegations about a child as an additional way of bullying them. Educators should not jump to hasty conclusions and assign blame without a thorough assessment of the situation. This entire process should not take longer than a week. If bullying continues, write to the school’s principal or administrator and include evidence from your notes to back up your complaint. Putting a complaint in writing is important so there is a record of your concern. Most administrators and staff are responsive to bullying concerns. However, if your school administrator is unable or unwilling to stop the bullying, write to your school superintendent for assistance. Be persistent. You may need to keep speaking out about the bullying that your child experiences.

When should law enforcement become involved?

Consider involving the police if another child has physically assaulted your child or is seriously threatening him or her with bodily injury. If the problem persists or escalates and your school officials are unable to stop the bullying, you may want to consult an attorney. Ask the school to keep a written record of all offenses committed against your child in case law enforcement officials need the information for further complaints.

Bully Prevention

Bullying happens in every school, but with an effective bullying prevention program, bullying can be reduced. If your child is being bullied, chances are that there are other children in the school who are having similar experiences. If your school does not have official anti-bullying policies or an active bullying prevention program, work with other parents and your school officials to develop one.

If your child is not a student at Shotokan Karate Leadership School® enroll right now! Our program will help build your child’s confidence and self-discipline so they can handle anything! Research has shown that getting a Black Belt reduces bullying more than any school based bullying prevention program!

kids bullying

Bullying Prevention Part One: What to Do If Your Child is Being Bullied

What Is Bullying?

(adapted from www.stopbullying.gov and the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program)

Bullying among children is aggressive behavior that is intentional and that involves an imbalance of power or strength. A child who is being bullied has a hard time defending himself or herself. Usually, bullying is repeated over time. Bullying can take many forms, such as hitting or punching (physical bullying); teasing or name-calling (verbal bullying); intimidation using gestures or social exclusion (nonverbal bullying or emotional bullying); and sending insulting messages by phone or computer e-mail (cyber bullying).

Effects Of Bullying
Bullying can have serious consequences. Children and youth who are bullied are more likely than other children to be depressed, lonely, anxious, have low self-esteem, be absent from school, feel sick, and think about suicide.

Reporting Bullying to Parents
Children frequently do not tell their parents that they are being bullied because they are embarrassed, ashamed, frightened of the children who are bullying them, or afraid of being seen as a “tattler.” If your child tells you about being bullied, it has taken a lot of courage to do so. Your child needs your help to stop the bullying.

What to do if your child is being bullied
1. Focus on your child.
Be supportive and gather information about the bullying. Never tell your child to ignore the bullying.What the child may “hear” is that you are going to ignore it. If the child were able to simply ignore it, he or she likely would not have told you about it. Ignoring bullying often allows it to become more serious. Don’t blame the child who is being bullied. Don’t assume that your child did something to provoke the bullying. Don’t say, “What did you do to aggravate the other child?” Listen carefully to what your child tells you about the bullying. Ask him or her to describe who was involved and how and where each bullying episode happened. Learn as much as you can about the bullying tactics used, and when and where the bullying happened. Can your child name other children or adults who may have witnessed the bullying? Empathize with your child. Tell him/her that bullying is wrong, not their fault, and that you are glad he or she had the courage to tell you about it. Ask your child what he or she thinks can be done to help. Assure him or her that you will think about what needs to be done and you will let him or her know what you are going to do.
If you disagree with how your child handled the bullying situation, don’t criticize him or her. Do not encourage physical retaliation (“Just hit them back”) as a solution. Hitting another student is not likely to end the problem; it could get your child suspended or expelled or escalate the situation. Check your emotions. A parent’s protective instincts stir strong emotions. Although it is difficult, a parent is wise to step back and consider the next steps carefully.

2. Contact your Child’s Teacher or Principal
Parents are often reluctant to report bullying to school officials, but bullying may not stop without the help of adults. Keep your emotions in check. Give factual information about your child’s experience of being bullied including who, what, when, where, and how. Emphasize that you want to work with the staff at school to find a solution to stop the bullying, for the sake of your child as well as other students. Do not contact the parents of the student(s) who bullied your child. This is usually a parent’s first response, but sometimes it makes matters worse. School officials should contact the parents of the
child or children who did the bullying. Expect the bullying to stop. Talk regularly with your child and with school staff to see whether the bullying has stopped. If the bullying persists, contact school authorities again.

3. Help your child become more resilient to bullying.
Help to develop talents or positive attributes of your child. Suggest and facilitate music, athletics, and art activities [Martial arts is a great choice!]. Doing so may help your child be more confident among his or her peers. Encourage your child to make contact with friendly students in his or her class. Your child’s teacher may be able to suggest students with whom your child can make friends, spend time, or collaborate on work.
Help your child meet new friends outside of the school environment. A new environment can provide a “fresh start” for a child who has been bullied repeatedly. Teach your child safety strategies. Teach him or her how to seek help from an adult when feeling
threatened by a bully. Talk about whom he or she should go to for help and role-play what he or she should say. Assure your child that reporting bullying is not the same as tattling.
Ask yourself if your child is being bullied because of a learning difficulty or a lack of social skills? If your child is hyperactive, impulsive, or overly talkative, the child who bullies may be reacting out of annoyance. This doesn’t make the bullying right, but it may help to explain why your child is being bullied. If your child easily irritates people, seek help from a counselor so that your child can better learn the informal social rules of his or her peer group. Home is where the heart is. Make sure your child has a safe and loving home environment where he or she can take shelter, physically and emotionally. Always maintain open lines of communication with your child.

Other resources and things You Can Do!
Go to www.stopbullying.gov for other materials on Bullying Prevention and parent resources. Bring a Shotokan Karate Leadership School® instructor to your school to talk about bullying prevention or help your teachers. Your Shotokan Karate Leadership School® Instructor can help your child’s school in a variety of ways including safety classes, character training, and more. All of this information is based on the most fully researched and effective Bullying Prevention Program in the world – the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (Olweus.org). Encourage your school’s administration to have an Olweus Certified Trainer come to your child’s school and implement the program.
If your child is not a student at Shotokan Karate Leadership School® enroll right now! The Shotokan Karate Leadership School® program will help build your child’s confidence and self-discipline so they can handle anything! Research has shown that getting a Black Belt reduces bullying more than any school based bullying prevention program!

Why Shotokan Karate Just Might Be Right for Your Family

“You’re playing small doesn’t serve the world. There’s nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do.”

-Marianne Williamson

 

Parent, does your child sometimes not listen? Does he or she act out? Does he refuse to do homework or even go to school? Would he or she rather argue than do a
chore that takes 2 minutes? Are consequences a joke for him? Does she scream and throw temper tantrums? Does he threaten and swear? Does he argue and fight over everything? Does his school want you to put him on drugs? Is he, being recruited by a gang?
Or… is she afraid of her own shadow? Is he distracted and unable to concentrate?
It doesn’t matter which of these problems you’re facing, any one of them can make your life hell. They zap your strength, stress you out, and scare the living daylights out of you. Not to mention the looks you get from other parents… you know, the GOOD parents.

Have you tried everything your friends, neighbors, co-workers, psychologists, counselors, psychiatrists, and child specialists have suggested – tough love, soft love, bribing, negotiating, ignoring, positive thinking, education, therapy, counseling, tai chi, meditation,
etc., etc., etc. and nothing works.

Are you a moment away from calling the cops and letting them take
the damn kid away?

If even a little of this is your life, then Shotokan Karate Leadership Schools is
for you.

From our more than 8,000 students who have trained in the 30,000 classes
we have taught over the past 40+ years we know what it takes to turn a kid
from being shy or out-of-control into a child who is kind, respectful, responsible, considerate, trustworthy, and courageous. From observing the interactions between students and parents, we now believe that most parents in this situation suffer for the simple fact that they don’t know how to raise the child they have. But what’s more important is that their child suffers the most as a result of the inexperience of their parents.
Before introducing you more to Shotokan Karate Leadership Schools and our unique program please take a quick look at these U.S. Justice Department statistics:

• Alcohol is the leading cause of death among young people
• Homicide is second
• Suicide the third
• One million of our youth are members of 25,000 different gangs
• 20% of young adults are illicit drug users
• Millions of young Americans face a life in which their earning
potential is less than that of their parents

If parents knew what they were doing, would this be happening? The answer is clearly, no. Only truly bad parents (there aren’t that many of them) would wish this fate on their child.

Why are there no effective programs to help parents learn how to raise the child they have – not the child they wish they had?

Our training program addresses this issue. It starts with big ideas that will give you hope and help you to raise a child who lives out his dreams and makes the world a better place.
But, ignore these big ideas and your child will likely end up working for low wages, struggling to get by, feeling unfulfilled, and perhaps become a U.S. Justice Department statistic.

Our Success…

We’ll be the first to admit that we didn’t know what we were up against when we started.
But, after forty years of daily effort to provide our students with the very best
training possible we’ve gained a depth of understand that only comes from having kept at something for a long, long time. The primary question we’ve asked ourselves is ‘how can we better help the children who train with us and support their parents who
struggle everyday to do all they can for them?’

The modern world in which we live is complicated and difficult to navigate, especially for our children. Young people today are besieged by messages of violence, greed, and consumerism at every turn. They are encouraged to conform and follow the false promise of pop culture rather than think critically and become leaders. And for parents, the influence of pop culture can be difficult to overcome. How do we teach our children respect for themselves and others? How do we instill self-confidence and self-determination?
In other words, how can we provide them the tools to become leaders?

For four decades Sonoma County Karate Master Marty Callahan, founder of The Shotokan Karate Leadership School, has been doing just that. With a firm but gentle hand, Marty has guided thousands of young people toward achieving excellence in their lives through Shotokan Karate.

As a young man, Marty attended seminary with the goal of becoming a priest. Later he
changed paths and attended University of California Riverside, earning a B.A. in
psychology. “I feel what I do is similar to what a priest would do,” says Marty, with a smile. “I act as counselor, psychologist, trainer, and mentor to my students.”

Marty first began studying karate while in college. Having grown up in an abusive home, he was an angry young man interested in learning to fight.
The longer he trained, however, the more his focus shifted from fighting to character building and leadership skills. “Character development became the central focus of my training,” says Marty. “My teachers emphasized fighting, but I was more interested in becoming a better person. I realized that my anger was doing me more harm than good. Karate gave me the confidence to let go of it. I used to be a human ‘doing.’ I became a human ‘being.’ I was, and I am, being transformed.”

Marty earned his black belt in Shotokan Karate in 1972 and moved to Santa Rosa, California, in 1981 and opened the Shotokan Karate Leadership School, then called the Academy of Shotokan Karate.

The ultimate aim of the art of karate lies not in victory or defeat but in the perfection of the character of the individual. Shotokan Karate motto “When I opened my school, I wanted to share what I had gotten from karate with other people, kids and adults,” says Marty.

The Shotokan Karate Leadership School’s name says it all: It’s not about becoming a fighter; it’s about becoming a leader. Children don’t just put on a karate uniform and learn to fight, they learn respect for themselves and others, and are shown the path to realizing the potential hero that resides in us all. Together with like-minded board members (Shotokan Karate Leadership School is a non-profit organization under the auspices of Shotokan Leadership Institute), Marty has developed a unique and inspiring way to help kids find the potential hero that resides in them all.

Knowing that children love stories, they wrote and published a short book that tells the epic
story of a young boy named Tiger who suffers from a lack of self-confidence.
He has seen other kids being bullied and tormented and it has left him feeling scared, angry and helpless and he wants to do something about it.

Through Shotokan karate, Tiger embarks on a great journey encompassing 12 principles of leadership. Along the way he is forced to test himself, overcoming hurdles and obstacles, each imparting more knowledge and wisdom, and each bringing him closer to becoming a hero.

At Shotokan Karate Leadership School, each student is given a copy of this book, and each undertakes his or her own personal journey to becoming a hero. A huge map depicting Tiger’s mythical world hangs on the wall of the school, allowing each student to track their progress as they follow Tiger’s path toward becoming a hero themselves.

“By taking martial arts training and turning it into a story,” says Marty, “each child can become personally invested in the quest. It captures their imaginations. Kids thrive on stories, games and play; this is a story of leadership and how to gain the qualities of a hero. The kids love becoming part of it. They love the idea of becoming heroes and gaining the respect of their friends and family, and most importantly, themselves.” He pauses,
and adds, “Kids want to be heroes; we give them the opportunity to be the hero
they were meant to be.”

The results speak for themselves.

Over the 4 decades that Marty has personally guided over 8,000 students to higher levels of self-confidence and helped form their leadership ability. Many have gone on to become doctors, lawyers, teachers, contractors, engineers—community leaders.
“Through our program they freed themselves from the self-imposed
bonds that might have kept them from success,” says Marty. “We had a student once who was completely out of control, bouncing off the wall. His parents said he had ADHD and could not control his behavior. He wanted to be a hero, and after eighteen months of resisting the program he made the decision to change his behavior. He became a model student, helping others and demonstrating respect and leadership. We take kids who are so shy they won’t look you in the eye, and kids who are highly aggressive, and we transform them.”

The program typically takes three to five years to complete, after which students have a new understanding of power and what it means to be a leader in their community, in addition to the confidence that comes from knowing they can defend themselves in a time of crisis.
Ironically though, the karate skills learned at the school are intended to prevent fights.

Marty grins when he talks about watching his students’ attitudes
transform as they move through their program.

“I love seeing them go from being kids who are distracted and out of control
to young people who are confident, respectful, clear thinking, focused, and compassionate,” he says. “It doesn’t get any better than that.”

How We Are Unique

Our edge over every other form of behavior management whether it is psychosocial, philosophical, or pharmacological is that we address the deep-seated need to defend ourselves. Our training program makes clear to the student that with the proper
inspiration, teaching, coaching, support and training they can do that. Because the student knows he or she needs this they allow us to shape their character. For centuries martial artists have led their communities during times of peace and defended them in times of war. The defensive training systems that were needed were developed long ago, but until now the
leadership training was provided only to a select few. We have created a proprietary leadership training system unlike any other anywhere in the world. Now students who practice with us become leaders. Trained not only in how to defend themselves, but in how to face danger and be a force for good in the world.
When they graduate from The Black Belt Shoka Leader Program they are certified as Shotokan Karate Black Belt Leaders. It is a personal development process that transforms children into hero/leaders and their parents into leaders. It is truly unique in that there is no other leadership-training program like it in the world.

Now for a little input from our students…

“I can’t imagine the person I would have been if I hadn’t practiced
karate.”
Jackson started training in Shotokan Karate at age 4. He stopped at age
17 when his family moved. A few years later he realized how much it
had changed him and how much he missed it. As a young adult he now
wants to resume his training.
Jackson Reynolds. age 21
SRJC Student in the fall of 2012

“My son Braden’s confidence and interpersonal skills have changed
tremendously over the past year. SKLS has played a crucial role in the
improvement we have seen. Thank you, Sensei, for your attention to
detail and the guidance that you have given my son.”
Kirstin Mather, mother of Braden Mather
Full-time mom, part-time photographer
Lives in Santa Rosa
Braden started training with us in February of 2010

“My son, Jared, trained with you about 25 years ago when he was 8
years old. We enrolled him in your school because he was being
bullied at school. He left feeling much more confident and went on to
become a physician. He now practices medicine in Portland Oregon.
We are very grateful for what you did.”
Janice Shipley, At the iLearn Fair in Santa Rosa, CA Feb. 4, 2012

Text from a call that came into our school in June of 2011
“Sensei, my name is Dean. I was your student 15 years ago. I’m calling
because I want to thank you for giving me the foundation for a
wonderful life. The training I received from you has helped me in
innumerable ways. I have a wonderful life and I don’t believe it would
have turned out this way without the training that I received from you.
Thank you from the bottom of my heart.”

Patti was the mother of four kids ages 8, 10, 17 and 19. Jolie, age 8, and
Rex, age 10, had been taking karate for two years. School was ending
and the two kids felt pressured. They wanted to take a break from
karate. But Patti told them, “No, you can’t.” They asked why. She told
them, “Because karate teaches you what school can’t teach you. Things
like respect, how to be with yourself, and self control.” She asked them
if they wanted self control and they said yes. She had talked about this
before with them and they had said they wanted to control their lives;
they didn’t want someone else to. She had told them that karate would
give them courage, integrity, humility, and it would teach them to be
responsible and caring adults. They wanted this for themselves.
They saw the difference between what they learned at school and
what they learned at karate. And they could see the difference
between themselves and their friends who weren’t taking karate.
And Patti was learning too. “I’m learning about what I need to do as a
parent. I have to provide support and parent enforcement. The kids
are at an age where they’re not strong enough to put their foot down
on themselves. Even my 19 year old daughter has a hard time. She’s a
freshman in college and I was telling her every day ‘You’ve got to wake
up early and get your Mustang warmed up so you can get to class on
time.’ But she complained and said, ‘Mother, I’m an adult now. Let me
make my own decisions.’ So, I backed off. Well she got a boyfriend, got
distracted and ended up dropping out of school. Now she has no job, is
back living at home, and we have to start all over. It’s not going to
happen again. Now I know what I have to do as her mom.”
Patti Rudolph, July, 2012

How Karate has Affected My Life

It has been nearly two years since I started karate and it has
affected my life in several different ways. I can recall one particular
moment in time when this occurred. During my freshman year at the
Junior College, I felt like I was more of a follower than a leader. When I
was in my English 100 class one of my classmates asked “Are you
more of a follower or a leader?” I replied back “A follower because I
am good at listening and taking orders from people”. After saying
those words I realized that I was not satisfied with being a follower. I
decided to replace my old submissive habits with confidence and
ambition. I accomplished this goal by taking a Karate class at the JC
early in the morning.
It began with me having to wake up early so I could arrive to class
on time, which took lots of discipline. Then when I first began sparring
with another student I felt like I had to step up my game and to draw
from my inner strength. I had to have the will to attack my opponent
and to defend myself when they struck. Over time my skills improved
through sparring and practicing the katas repeatedly. By the end of the
semester I had advanced in rank 8th kyu yellow belt. After ranking up I
felt much more confidence in myself because I had the ability to
defend others as well as myself. I knew that if the situation demanded
it I could be a leader.
Jake Robbins

About month ago my sister announced that she was getting
married in two months. It’s been really stressful on our family. Being
the maid of honor everyone comes to me to tie up any loose ends of
there plans. Learning how to clear my mind in karate is something I
now do a lot in my daily life. It helps me find peace when things seem
like they’re going to explode and I’m able to think clearer in chaotic
situations.

Nikki Fredenberg

I have always had a problem with public speaking and performing
in front of a large crowd of people. In the past I would be so nervous
that I would almost go into an anxiety attack! I would build the task at
hand up so big in my head it would feel very overwhelming. This
semester I was faced with these two problems multiple times. Not only
did I have to speak but also I had to perform in front of a large crowd
three times. But through my study of Karate, I was able to overcome
my fears and do well while really stepping up into a confident
leadership role.

One of the many important things I learned through my study, and
it was a key to overcoming my fears, was the absence of mind.
Through practice I was able to learn how to emotionally detach myself
from a serious situation and just react when necessary. This was so
helpful. I was able to step back from the situation, look at it for what it
was, determine the best course of action and overcome my fear of
public speaking and performing. Through karate I have become a
stronger person spiritually, mentally, and physically.
Matthew Briggs

This semester I learned a really important thing while taking karate. A
piece of advice I use a lot in my everyday life. This semester we
learned that our biggest enemies are ourselves. With me that is very
very true. I am constantly beating myself down, saying stuff like “I’m
not good enough”, or “I am going to fail.” I wouldn’t just do this
sometime, I would do this with almost everything I do, sports, school,
anything. One thing in particular that I liked was when we used
ourselves as targets. It helped me put myself in check and realize that I
won’t achieve greatness if I don’t allow myself too. So now when I get
down on myself I look in a mirror and think to myself, “I am my own
blockade, I can do this, and I can achieve this goal.” Because I believe in
my own potential and know that if I tear myself down then it’s over
before it even begins. So this class did wonders for my self esteem and
confidence and I am really glad I took it.

Karate In My Life

When I signed up for a karate class I was expecting a self defense
course, yet self defense was the least important lesson that I learned in
my karate class. I never thought that this class were more focused on
training your character instead of your body.
I did gained all the benefits of exercising and self defensive
tactics, but the most important lessons that I learned was becoming a
better person overall. I learned discipline, humility, courage, the
responsibility that comes with power, pride in what you do, respect,
control my nerves, and more; however, the most important lesson was
confidence on myself. I was able to rapidly incorporate karate in my
very day life, without even realized.
I notice that I start to participate more on class, without being shy.
I improve my social skills inside the classroom and attend study
groups, I was able to focus more and retain more information. Being
able to express yourself without having fear of being judge is really important for personal development. I was very pleased with the
results of karate.
Now that the semester is over, I realize that it is just the
beginning. Seeking perfection of character every day, knowing that
you will never be perfect takes lots of practice and discipline in all
senses. I want to be better everyday, and I now know I can.
Gillian Trevelyan
Spring ’10 Karate Final

Dear Sensei Callahan,
I’m not sure you remember me, but my name is Benjamin Wright son
of who is now Marta May. I was instructed in Shotokan in my early
years at your dojo on Hall Road. I wanted to contact you and thank you
for your instruction. You taught me discipline and honor, which have
given me an advantage when interacting with my peers. I cannot find
the words to describe the attributes I have developed from your
lessons, but these attributes give me confidence as I prepare to leave
for college. I will be going to school at the Art Institute of Chicago and
I’m thankful that I have retained so much martial arts training in such
a dangerous city.
Thank you for your assistance in my conditioned development.
Sincerely: Benjamin Wright
NOTE: Spring, 2013, Benjamin is 22 and a student at the Art Institute
of Chicago and will be graduating in June, 2013 and then heading to
China.

“You’ve helped me grow exponentially.” January, 2012
“Karate has saved my life.” November, 2011
Alec Reshefsky

I had been training with Sensei Callahan for about 5 years. I was a
first-degree black belt. I was a pipefitter and worked for North Bay
Construction. I was working about 10 feet below ground in a trench
when a steel plate that was used to hold the walls of the trench up fell
on me. It weighed several hundred pounds. My workmates saw it
happen and thought that I must be dead. The steel plate slammed me
into the ground with my face was buried in the dirt. I couldn’t get my
breath. Then I heard Sensei’s voice telling me to ‘breath from my
center’ as he had said to me many times during class. I focused my
attention on my lower abdomen and began to breath again ever so
slowly. My co-workers got the steel plate off of me and I was taken to
the emergency room. X-rays showed my spine in dramatic curves.
Afterwards the doctor who oversaw my progress was amazed at how
quickly I recovered. Within a few weeks I was back at work again. I
attribute my survival and quick recovery to my karate training.
Miguel Espinza

What’s Bad About Shyness?

Shyness experts vary in their views about whether childhood shyness leads to mental health problems later. However, the practical and emotional problems caused by shyness are apparent. As a practical matter, shy children obtain less practice of social skills and develop
fewer friends. They tend to avoid activities, such as sports, drama, and debate that would put them in the limelight. Shy children tend to be perceived as shy, unfriendly, and untalented, and they tend to feel lonely and have low self-esteem (Jones & Carpenter, 1986) and a higher than average level of gastrointestinal problems (Chung & Evans, 2000). Shy children tend to become anxious teens (Prior, Smart, Sanson, & Oberklaid, 2000). Shy adults tend to have smaller social networks and to feel less satisfied than others with their social support networks (Jones & Carpenter, 1986). I have known shy college students who never graduate because they fear taking a required public speaking class. Many shy individuals think of their shyness as a significant problem that hinders them in myriad ways (Zimbardo, 1986). Fortunately, some individuals act less shy as they become older (Zimbardo, 1986). However, even these individuals may regret their prior shyness, thinking sadly of the social opportunities they missed.

– Excerpt from Helping young children overcome shyness by John Malouff, Ph.D., J.D.
Senior Lecturer in Psychology

Protect your child from the crippling effects of shyness.

Contact us today and find out how we can help.

Don’t wait until it’s too late.

707-575-1681